LAW ENFORCEMENT ARCHIVES

Five Key Domains of Incident Management

Effective incident management is a set of activities, not policy box-ticking of doctrine that may or may not be followed. A new free toolkit based on five key domains can help incident management teams assess and improve their effectiveness regardless of the incident, incident management team, and policy doctrine members

Jane Doe – Responding to Vulnerable Patients

Despite the prevalence of first responders encountering human trafficking victims, they are not always aware of the signs or proper handling of the situation to ensure the health, safety, and well-being of victims. One paramedic shares his experience with an encounter that provided him lessons to share.

From Shadows to Light: Addressing the Aftermath of Human Trafficking

The deadly opioid epidemic in the United States does not stop at overdoses. It also poses life-threatening exposure to first responders who arrive on scene. Learn about the new ways scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are expanding detection strategies and technologies to keep these responders safe.

Invisible Chains: Human Trafficking, Drug Abuse, and Support

Despite the physical force that is often portrayed in movies, human traffickers more often lure their victims using psychological tactics. As a result, the victims can become dependent on the traffickers and the substances they supply. Trauma-informed care and advocacy are actions first responders, legislators, and others can take to

Fentanyl Hazards and Detection

The deadly opioid epidemic in the United States does not stop at overdoses. It also poses life-threatening exposure to first responders who arrive on scene. Learn about the new ways scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are expanding detection strategies and technologies to keep these responders safe.

The Nexus Between Drug and Human Trafficking

Transnational criminal organizations are using their experience in drug trafficking to utilize routes and operating procedures to take advantage of other criminal opportunities, such as human trafficking.

A Plan to Protect the Youngest Children

Most educational and training programs for protecting schools against targeted violence, drugs, and human trafficking do not include the youngest students – preschoolers. However, one program in Florida that is free to the schools is an example of how other states can close this preparedness gap.

National Security: A Range of Threats

From organized foreign terrorist groups to homegrown terrorists inspired by them, members of the intelligence community have indicated that the threat of attack inside the U.S. has increased to its highest point since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Communities must explore solutions to meet the ongoing challenges and

The Missing Plague Vials

A true story of missing bubonic plague vials, an airport bomb threat, and other suspicious activities again demonstrate continued national and homeland security vulnerabilities and threats. Perspectives may differ, but the concerns are real and provide an opportunity to learn and prepare.

Mental Awareness to Enhance Preparedness

Emergency managers, public health officials, and first responders often stress the importance of physical fitness, but what about mental fitness? Without focused mental agility in even one of the emergency management phases, mistakes or subpar performance are likely. Learn about this author’s new acronym that can help prioritize mental health

Interoperability During Mass Casualty Incidents

During a mass casualty incident, response agencies must be able to communicate in real-time. This means that interoperability plans need to include everyone involved in the response. One lesson learned from past incidents is that hospitals are an often overlooked “responder.” Learn what one agency is doing to close this

The Evolution of Homeland Security Higher Education

After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, homeland security education expanded to ensure that local, state, tribal, territorial, and federal agencies had the tools they needed to combat these threats. This academic leader shares how homeland security programs change to meet new challenges and evolving threats.

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